Herding Code 98: Dale Ragan on Moncai

In the previous episode, when the guys were talking to Jackson Harper about Manos de Mono, he mentioned that Dale Ragan was doing cooking up something really exciting for hosting ASP.NET web applications with support for deployment via Git or Mercurial. So, they called him up and recorded a show right then and there. Jackson stayed on, and we got the scoop on Moncaí. Get the scoop and find out how you can get in on the just announced private beta.

  • Jon asks about where we can keep up with information about SineSignal.
  • There’s a discussion of what Heroku is, and how Moncai relates to Heroku.
  • Dale describes how he the idea got started and how deployment works.
  • What’s a Moncaí? Dale explains.
  • Dale explains how the infrastructure works, with Linux and Mono running in virtual environments.
  • Kevin and Jon ask about how Mono hosting affects ASP.NET support.
  • Jon asks about fractional CPU pricing, which leads to another cool feature – free accounts until you need to scale up.
  • Dale talks about how this compares to other virtual hosting offerings.
  • Jackson (still on the call from last show) jumps in with some info on running Mono from Visual Studio.
  • There’s talk about future possibilities – Mercurial, Windows support (and the complexities with SSH), support for other stacks.
  • Jon asks about the next steps for go-live.
  • Kevin asks about batch jobs, and Dale talks about the extension points for add-on and web hooks.
  • Jackson asks about local file access.
  • Everyone decides that this is really cool, and the show ends.

Show Links:

Download / Listen:

Herding Code 98: Dale Ragan on Moncaí

[audio:http://herdingcode.com/wp-content/uploads/HerdingCode-0098-Dale-Ragan-on-Moncai.mp3]

Herding Code 97: Jackson Harper on Manos de Mono

In this episode of Herding Code, the guys talk with Jackson Harper about Manos de Mono, his lightweight web application framework that runs on Mono. The goal of Manos is to simplify the entire process of creating, managing and updating a web application from prototyping and design to deployment.  Manos aims to be Simple, Testable, High Performance, Reusable and Flexible. Sounds kind of dreamy, right?  Listen in this week and find out how C# and Mono can be a viable option for web application development.

  • The show kicks off with Harper offering an overview of the Manos Web Application Framework. He notes his preference in using frameworks like Django over ASP.NET, his appreciation  for Mono and  C# and how these factors lent themselves to the creation of Manos.
  • Kevin asks what’s different and interesting about Manos compared to ASP.NET MVC.  Jackson speaks the philosophy of application development and digs into simplifying developer workflow. 
  • Kevin asks what Manos includes.  Harper lists off the simple routing, template engine and a non-blocking web server.  He also notes that Manos will support any ORM and configuration management is in the works.
  • The guys talk about the simple and flexible routing system and continue to conversation by digging into Manos’s html-centric templating engine. 
  • Jackson walks through the developer steps to get going with Manos and is quick to note that Manos is not geared to the Windows developer.  There will be Mac and Windows support but it is being build with Linux in mind.
  • Kevin and Jackson get into the core bits – what’s included from the .NET Framework and what’s custom built?  Harper calls out that he’s not referencing System.Web and his custom HTTP server is built on Tornado.
  • Jon asks about session management, authentication and security.  Jackson talks about how the wish to ease deployment drove much of the implementation and custom component decisions.
  • Jackson further explains his interest in creating his non-blocking web server and why it benefits such operations as long pulling.  This prompts Jon to asks if Manos is an alternative to learning Node.js.
  • Jackson talks about stealing users and pie.
  • Jackson talks about his strict No XML policy and how that will work into Manos’s configuration management faculties.
  • Kevin and Jackson explore model binding in ASP.NET MVC and Manos.
  • Jon summarize what Manos has to offer – lght-weight, more html-like view engine, the routing system is nice, non-threaded architecture and high-performance – and asks how Harper decides what gets into Manos?  Jackson explains the framework is more driven by need rather than trying to implement merely what other frameworks offer.
  • K Scott asks about the challenges of working with a static language, C#, in this space.  Jackson flips the question on its head and talks about the benefits.
  • K Scott and Jackson talk about open and close mustaches, type safety, anonymous types and Manos’s templating code.
  • Kevin asks about inspiration and Jackson reflects on how Manos came to be – starting with a focus on development flow to his need for a cleaner view engines to ease of deployment and then his interest in a non-blocking web server.
  • Jon asks about applications running on Manos and the long pulling niche.
  • Jackson talks about how .NET sets itself apart from other languages when it comes to parallelism and multi-core computing.   Jon and Jackson talk about how parallel extensions are used in Manos and how Manos could be used to manage tasks on the server with C#.
  • @zbowling asks about the C10K Problem and the ability to handle 10,000 connections at once.
  • Scott K and Jackson discuss how have your own HTTP stack makes development and deployment a lot easier.
  • The show wraps with talk of route definition management, Sinatra and Cooking for Geeks.

Show Links:

Show notes compiled by Ben Griswold. Thanks!

Download / Listen:

Herding Code 97: Jackson Harper on Manos

[audio:http://herdingcode.com/wp-content/uploads/HerdingCode-0097-Jackson-Harper-on-Manos.mp3]

Herding Code 96: Eric Sink on Veracity and DVCS

This week on Herding Code, the guys talk with Eric Sink, cofounder of SourceGear, about Veracity and Distributed Version Control Systems. Listen in and learn about Veracity’s architecture including pluggable layers and a unique approach to data storage all built on an impressive technical stack. And get an answer to the question that everyone’s asking “Why does the world need another DVCS?” All this and more, this week on Herding Code.

  • Kevin wastes no time kicking the show off with THE question – “Why Veracity? Why another DVCS?” Eric talks DVCS and the future of source control, how Git and Mercurial are just getting us started and how there’s no distributed system which is good at solving problems of the enterprise.
  • So, what does Veracity offer that Git, Mercurial and Bazaar do not? Eric describes record, field and constraint-based (opposed to folder and file-based) version control and how if it fits nicely inside of Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).
  • Eric compares the Veracity data storage model with NoSQL and Berkeley DB. This prompts Jon to ask about where SQLite comes into play.
  • Eric digs into the pluggable storage layer, “Zing” and component layers for Scrum or wikis, for example.
  • Jon asks about the nightly snapshots (releases) and Eric runs us through the intentionally not-so-easy build process.
  • The conversation shifts back to differences between Veracity and a Git or Mercurial. The guys talk about branching models and rebasing.
  • Scott K asks about free source control hosting and the guys comment about the community and social networking aspect of Bitbucket and GitHub.
  • Kevin asks if there was ever thought of building ALM tools on top of Mercurial or Git. Eric talks about DVCS functionality, licensing and what the enterprise wants.
  • Eric explains Veracity’s open source license, which components will and will not be open sources and speaks to community patches.
  • Jon asks if the Veracity data layer could be used to support other applications and not just version control.
  • Scott K asks about dogfooding Veracity – when did SourceGear start versioning Veracity in Veracity?
  • Eric explains his choice to write Veracity in C. The guys talk about cross platform development and Scott K asks about extensions and wrappers.
  • Jon beats Scott K to the punch and asks why Node.js isn’t included in Veracity’s impressive technical stack.
  • Kevin asks about plans to develop a Visual Studio plugin or a version control tools like TortoiseSVN.
  • Eric answers a Twitter question from Andrew Tobin about migration support. Kevin ask if there will be a feature like GitSVN for Veracity.
  • Kevin asks Eric to explain the need for exclusive file locks. Eric explains this need for industries like Gaming which deal with a large amount of binary files.
  • Jon and Eric talk more about the enterprise and what’s important to them.
  • Jon talks more about Veracity’s stack and the use of (wait for it) SVG for Veracity burn down charts.
  • Scott K asks why SourceGear went with SpiderMonkey over Script Monkey or V8.
  • Jon talks about portability and asks if Mono has a place in Veracity development.
  • Jon and Eric talk about Scrum and the enterprise’s current interest in Agile. This topic rolls into talk of browsers.
  • Kevin asks if SoureGear has concern that Microsoft may someday enter the DVCS space.
  • Scott K wraps the show asking how Eric defines success for Veracity.

Show Links:

Show notes compiled by Ben Griswold. Thanks!

Download / Listen:

Herding Code 96: Eric Sink on Veracity and DVCS

[audio:http://herdingcode.com/wp-content/uploads/HerdingCode-0096-Eric-Sink-on-Veracity-and-DVCS.mp3]