In this episode of Herding Code, the guys speak with Mark Rendle about his Simple.Data and Fix projects.

  • The show begins with Mark’s Simple.Data elevator pitch in which he explains that Simple.Data is an ORM without the O, the R or the M.
  • Jon asks about Mark’s heavy use of dynamic types in the Simple.Data source. Mark talks about the Method Missing pattern in Ruby and how that translates to dynamic .NET programming in Simple.Data.
  • Jon and Mark dig deeper into the code and then they walkthrough project advancement from supporting basic CRUD functions to the recent addition of database transactions.
  • Mark shares Simple.Data’s current and future support for numerous relational and non-relational databases.
  • Jon and Mark talk about the use of MEF, rather than a full-blown IoC container, in Simple.Data.
  • Scott K and Mark discuss Simple.Data tests, their implementation and the TDD and FDD (Fear-driven development) which Mark took while developing his project.
  • Kevin asks if the heavy use of dynamics instigated the need to write more tests. Mark answers by sharing his views on why coders might prefer either static or dynamic typed languages.
  • Jon asks about Simple.Data adoption and code optimizations which might be required to support increased production use.
  • Mark digs into Reactive Extensions and how it’s used in Simple.Data.
  • Mark talks about the growing movement of simple web development projects and the tools/frameworks which support these efforts and, coincidently, answers @AaronOnTheWeb‘s Twitter-submitted question.
  • @CodeReflection asks about Simple.Data support for aggregates which prompts a discussion about where/how these operations should be handled.
  • @jacksonh asks about support for asynchronous operations.
  • The conversation switches to Mark’s involvement with OWIN and his Crack Fix project offers an ultra-lightweight web glue for .NET, written in C#..
  • K Scott notes Mark’s awesome gravitar choice Jerry Statler
  • Mark closes by mentioning his participation in DDD (DeveloperDeveloperDeveloper!), Skills Matter Cloud Evening, and then Cambridge NxtGenUG (Next Generation User Group).

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Show notes compiled by Ben Griswold. Thanks!

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Herding Code 106: Mark Rendle on Simple.Data

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